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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the things I really disliked about my former ride, a Honda Goldwing, was how awkward it was to check tire pressure (and add air if needed) of the rear tire. While some folks used the center stand, for the last few years I was just too unsteady with the 920 pound bike to get it up on the center stand. So I would end up lying flat on the ground, squirming around with my fake knees and damaged shoulders to get to that tire stem. I really didn't think about that on the Spyder, but it looks like checking the rear tire will be a real challenge. Curious as to how the rest of you handle this necessary chore. I'm tempted to get the pressure to a bit higher than the recommended 28 psi so that it would be a lot longer between pressure checks.
 

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'17 RT Limited
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I'm tempted to get the pressure to a bit higher than the recommended 28 psi so that it would be a lot longer between pressure checks.
That's not a bad idea, depending on what you mean by "a bit".
Sounds to me like you are an excellent candidate for a tire pressure monitor system.
I think FOBO is one made for motorcycles and I think they have one model with 3 sensors for a Spyder.
Seems like I remember that it will even "talk to" the integrated Garmin......but not sure about that.

I've been thinking about it too......but don't want anything that requires my phone to be part of the "system".
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. But I was wondering if everyone has to do the "laying flat on the ground and trying to squeeze your hand into the wheel to get to the tire stem" nightmare, especially for old guys like me. I'm tempted to just bit a pain in the ass to the dealer and go in periodically and ask that they check the air pressure in the rear tire and add air if needed. At least while the Spyder is under warranty I hope I can get them to do that.
 

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Thanks. But I was wondering if everyone has to do the "laying flat on the ground and trying to squeeze your hand into the wheel to get to the tire stem" nightmare, especially for old guys like me.
Yes. I certainly do.
And yes, I fit the "old guy" description. :oops:

IF.....I have the valve stem in the right position, toward the back and slightly toward the bottom, then I don't have much problem getting TO it by kneeling or sitting on the floor. It is getting back UP that is the problem.
 

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Looking at the rear wheel from the left side, the driver's left, move the Spyder forward or rearward until the valve stem is between 4:00 and 5:00 o'clock and set the parking brake. Then move directly to the rear of the vehicle, kneel down on as many knees as you choose, reach to the valve stem with whatever hand you choose (if you use the right hand reach in from the right side), remove the valve stem cap. Use a tire gauge with a short 90 degree chuck and check the pressure. If you have to add air connect a Harley, yes, Harley because they work very well, valve stem extension, Search | Harley-Davidson USA. I'm 80, 6'3", and do it at least weekly or before a ride as necessary, and have never had to lie on the floor to do the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looking at the rear wheel from the left side, the driver's left, move the Spyder forward or rearward until the valve stem is between 4:00 and 5:00 o'clock and set the parking brake. Then move directly to the rear of the vehicle, kneel down on as many knees as you choose, reach to the valve stem with whatever hand you choose (if you use the right hand reach in from the right side), remove the valve stem cap. Use a tire gauge with a short 90 degree chuck and check the pressure. If you have to add air connect a Harley, yes, Harley because they work very well, valve stem extension, Search | Harley-Davidson USA. I'm 80, 6'3", and do it at least weekly or before a ride as necessary, and have never had to lie on the floor to do the job.
Thanks for the info. I just ordered the Harley extension and hope it allows me to check the pressure and add air without having to lie on the ground. Just curious, do you keep the pressures as recommended in the owner's manual or use different pressures?
 

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Just curious, do you keep the pressures as recommended in the owner's manual or use different pressures?
There is generally no good reason to deviate from the factory recommendation.
In this case, however, the OEM stock Kenda tires will feel better to most riders with up to 4 extra pounds in both fronts.
When I changed tires, I went back to the recommendation.
 

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Thanks for the info. I just ordered the Harley extension and hope it allows me to check the pressure and add air without having to lie on the ground. Just curious, do you keep the pressures as recommended in the owner's manual or use different pressures?
I ditched the Crapenda OEM tires, run Federal EVOs on front at 14 psi and General Altimax on rear at 19.
 

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2019 RT Limited Named Charlotte
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That's not a bad idea, depending on what you mean by "a bit".
Sounds to me like you are an excellent candidate for a tire pressure monitor system.
I think FOBO is one made for motorcycles and I think they have one model with 3 sensors for a Spyder.
Seems like I remember that it will even "talk to" the integrated Garmin......but not sure about that.

I've been thinking about it too......but don't want anything that requires my phone to be part of the "system".
I have the FOBO Bike 2 for my 2019 RT Limited and it works great. The app will sound the alarm if it drops below parameters you set. About a $140 investment, if I remember correctly. Will update PSI status every time your phone comes within a few feet of the sensors.
 

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Will update PSI status every time your phone comes within a few feet of the sensors.
For that to happen, the app must be running ALL the time and I wouldn't be too happy with that.

I did a bit of research on this yesterday.
Garmin has discontinued the "Spyder" system that works with the 590.
The FOBO offering does not seem to be compatible with my old version of Android on my phone.
So I guess I'm stuck with a tire gauge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I installed the FOBO 2 Bike sensors today, and as expected, getting to the rear tire stem was a real pain. So once I was down on the ground flat on my back, I added air to the rear tire to bring it to 30 lbs, 2 over the recommended amount, which even if some leaks over time should be awhile before I need to add air. And the sensors will allow me to check air pressure before every ride for peace of mind. I also brought the front tires to 2 pounds over the recommended level as well. Riding with 22 front and 30 rear felt perfectly comfortable and fine today.
 

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Thanks for the info. I just ordered the Harley extension and hope it allows me to check the pressure and add air without having to lie on the ground. Just curious, do you keep the pressures as recommended in the owner's manual or use different pressures?
I bought a little red shop stool and can lower it down and inspect the lower bike and tires easily also the best for waxing I’m not that lazy bad back and shoulder
 

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2018 Can Am F 3 Limited 6 speed
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On my Wing I have 90 deg valve stems and I fitted one of those Easy Lift extentions. Majic.

Thinking for my F 3 I will just lay on the ground if I dont have a jack available.
Haven't had a play yet as the Bloke I picked it up from lay on the ground and checked it before I rode away.

Not really a good idea at all upping the pressures, thats a can of worms. o_O
Stick to plan A.
 

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2021 Spyder RT Limited
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One of the things I really disliked about my former ride, a Honda Goldwing, was how awkward it was to check tire pressure (and add air if needed) of the rear tire. While some folks used the center stand, for the last few years I was just too unsteady with the 920 pound bike to get it up on the center stand. So I would end up lying flat on the ground, squirming around with my fake knees and damaged shoulders to get to that tire stem. I really didn't think about that on the Spyder, but it looks like checking the rear tire will be a real challenge. Curious as to how the rest of you handle this necessary chore. I'm tempted to get the pressure to a bit higher than the recommended 28 psi so that it would be a lot longer between pressure checks.
I just bought the FOBO tire pressure sensors from Slingmods and downloaded the FOBO app and now all I have to do is check the app to check my tire pressure.
 

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From Amazon, I bought 4" metal valve extensions that will screw onto the valve thru the voids in the drive pulley. Then hook your pressure gauge onto it. I use a motorcycle tire lift to raise the rear tire and rotate the wheel to 5:00, then put the extension thru and screw it to valve. This way I can sit on stool and git er dun.
 
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