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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I test road a Spyder RTL the other day. Coming from my DCT Goldwing would be an adjustment but after a few miles I think I would adapt o.k.
But my question is about the sensitivity of the steering. Never got over 40 mph but the steering seemed to be a bit 'twitchy' for lack of a better term. Does that feeling fade as you p/u speed as cars do? Can't imagine that being or feeling safe at interstate speeds.
Thanks for your input.
 

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Welcome to the forum from North Carolina. Glad you decided to join us. I come from a lifetime of Goldwings. That twitchy feeling is just because it is new to you. It helps to not hold onto the grips too tight. These trikes do have instantaneous steering reaction to the riders input and once you get used to it, all will be fine.
 

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I'm a somewhat new convert to the Spyder RTL myself, and I had a bit of adjustment to overcome in my first 500 - 700 miles or so on my 2022 model. I've been a 2-wheel rider for 40+ years, having owned more than 30 motorcycles during those years (ranging from Hondas, BMWs, Ducatis, Triumphs, and other makes I can't think of off-hand). The Spyder's steering takes a bit of getting used to, and I found that I had to relax my grip a bit to lessen the inputs to the bars that caused some of the steering "weirdness" I was feeling. As many would suggest on this forum, changing out the stock anti-sway bar to a Baja Ron's Sway Bar and the front shocks to Elkas really helped improve the steering dynamics and handling of my Spyder. My Spyder tracks well and I don't feel any need to correct my inputs at all anymore. It was a Night and Day improvement...I am a firm believer in these two mods. Even my wife noticed the Spyder's improved handing and ride after we picked the Spyder up from my local dealer that made the installations for me. Practically every time we got on the Spyder after the mods, my wife says "I'm so glad you changed out the shocks and swaybar...this bike handles so much better!!" Now that I'm approaching 67, my knees, shoulders and overall strength aren't like they used to be, so going to a Spyder has helped me feel confident and safer on the road, especially with my wife on the back. I know that after a few hundred miles on your Spyder, and especially if you make the mods I mentioned, you'll love it. Of course, you may want to pick up a nice pre-owned Triumph Bonneville or a BMW RT to go out for a little ride on some curvy roads once in a while! I'm sure others here will share their experiences too!
 

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'17 RT Limited
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It is mostly in your head. :oops:

But an explanation is needed.
After YEARS of riding on 2 wheels, your brain has "learned" how to react to tactile inputs ON 2 WHEELS.
Like side winds, creases in the pavement, humps and valleys in the road, etc.
It also learned to counter-steer and lean to turn.

The problem then IS.......that none of that works anymore on 3 wheels but your sub-conscious brain is still trying to do them. This results in rider over-correction.

So the biggest fix is: Lighten your grip and get some more seat time.
Kenda tires are crap and contribute to the squirrley feeling.
Alignment often helps too.
Look down the road and not down AT the road right in front of you.
Be sure your front pressures are up and equal. If you have Kenda tires, a couple of extra PSI can help.

I found that the sway bar did almost nothing for me.......but by that time I had more experience and I ride mostly in a straight line. I would never spend the money on shocks unless I was going to ride like a race driver.
 

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2018 Can Am F 3 Limited 6 speed
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My previous big ride bike was a GL1800. Had over a decade and liked it very much. But it was time..

The Spyder is entirely different. I have a 2017 F3 Ltd ( top box and panniers) with a big F4 screen and winglets. Wind is similar. Visor up riding unless its raining for me.

The ride. Well its not a bike its a trike. No lean and swapped out for gees. Nowhere as smooth - but thats ok with me. I would say a bit twitchy compared to the Wing but ok once ya get your head around it its fine.

You have to steer it, a bit like a car or a quad bike, there is no nod of the head and counter-steer - hands hardly move... if you get my drift.

If your uncertain I would hire one or organize and all day ride with various road riding opportunities. Not just a freeway up and down.

I do like the 6 speed quick-shifter. Its Majic.

Hope this helps.
 

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I had the same feeling after trading in my Honda VT1800 on a Spyder F3. Especially the first 20-30 miles or so.

I got used to the difference fairly rapidly. I never realized how much I was turning the handlebars when leaning and counter steering on the Honda. Way more handlebar turning than is required for the Can Am.

Since there's no leaning and no counter steering on the Can Am, you have to be more subtle and gentle in turns. Trust that the Spyder will track straight with no handlebar input. If it doesn't, there's something wrong mechanically.

For a more "sporty" ride, learn to lean your body to the inside of turns, to weight the inside front wheel, and counteract the centrifugal force trying to lean the Can Am to the outside of the turn. It doesn't require an exaggerated or dangerous maneuver. Just lean into turns a bit, and you can hold a more precise line, and corner a bit faster.
 

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I ditto all the above. I have to say that my SPyder had 7K miles on it when I bought it used. I now have 37K on it after two and a half years one of which was high in covid. I bought it June 2020. I think it drives better now than ever. Beginning to think it's just getting broken in. I have no mods for shocks or the sway bar.
 
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