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Background - long term 2-wheel rider (most recently BMW GSs, Triumphs, Hondas) - who has a bad knee after 5 surgeries (4 unnecessary if the first one had worked). Sigh. But that is the case and I am where I am. I am 6'2", 240 (post Covid) lbs, and can only bend my left knee 70 degrees or so comfortably - so I need to stretch out a bit. If I want to continue to ride I need a DCT or automatic and the stability of a 3-wheeler. I ride 70% 2-up with my wife who loves to ride. I sat on a '21 Spider Limited and it worked.

Questions:
  • How many of you have migrated from a 2-wheeler?
  • What was the transition like (in terms of ease and time to get comfortable)?
  • How does the experience change?
  • Do you miss the lean and 2-wheels?

Thanks so much,

David
 

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Welcome David.
A LOT of new vehicles seem to be in short supply right now, Spyders included, so discounts are hard to find.

I rode "real" motorcycles for about 50 years.
I HATED the different geometry and feel of the Spyder at first.
It took me about 6 months and a couple of thousand miles and some "fixes" before I got comfortable.

Now I have learned to live with it but it is a different experience.

Do not buy one without some test rides.
The first one might actually be somewhat scary......IF you actually learned to ride on 2 wheels properly.
 

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I made the switch from 2017 Indian Springfield, an 875# Torque monster to a 2017 Spyder RT. No two bikes could be more different but after a few months I am not looking back and having a blast on the RT. I too went through knee nightmares... The first TKR they used a Cobalt Chromium replacement and I am the one guy in 10K that is deathly allergic to Cobalt. After 8 months of hell on earth they cut my leg off again and put in ceramic hybrid knee with better results though it will never be completely right... sigh.

At age 69 I knew eventually pushing around the 875# Indian was likely going to become problematic so traded it in while I could still get a decent value out of it. The sensitive nature of the steering of the Spyder surprised me but after some research I took the advice i found on this Forum to take it in for a laser alignment and the difference is day and night. The ride and handling improved dramatically. I love the auto trans, super smooth and effortless though I do like to manually downshift most of the time even though it is not required... nice that I have the option. Having reverse is awesome and the fit and finish is comparable to my indian and that is indeed high praise. It took about 500 miles {+/-} to get it dialed in and yes I miss leaning but riding aggressively is still a hoot.

I added the larger brake pedal and a guard between the drive belt and rear tire to protect the drive belt and gears as I occasionally find myself on a dirt road though most of my riding is on pavement. A Ram mount for my iPhone and key rings {cables actually} complete everything I have done and until it is time for tires I have nothing further contemplated. The R
6707
T is smooth and quiet and goes like a scalded cat when you jump one it. My bride loved the Indian and the Harley before that but finds the Spyder to be the very best yet and we ride together a lot.

:cool:
 

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I traded in a 1200cc Triumph Trophy SE Sport Tourer for a 2020 RT. I'm a 'spirited' rider at age 74, on 2 wheels since 17. Next youngest in my crew is 54. I still ride with them and they didn't slow down.
It took me about 500 miles (2 outings) to learn my and the RT's limits. The Spyder requires more upper body action than a bike since you literally steer it rather than counter & lean.
Rule 1 - Forget everything you know about riding a bike.
Rule 2 - Don't 'steer' it, 'guide' it down the straights using light touch or it will wander from your upper body movements.
Rule 3 - Since the Spyder won't lean, you need do it. Faster cornering can be done if you prop outside leg and squeeze the inside tank with thigh which will also help reduce arm pressure in the corners (and to stay aboard!).

Once I changed a few suspension items & added a tune, I can now stay up with the big boys (which has them scratching their heads).

Bottom line for me is: It's different but just as much fun as all my prior bikes. AND, I don't need to ask a friend to help me pick it up when I lay it down for a nap at a rest stop!
 
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Background - long term 2-wheel rider (most recently BMW GSs, Triumphs, Hondas) - who has a bad knee after 5 surgeries (4 unnecessary if the first one had worked). Sigh. But that is the case and I am where I am. I am 6'2", 240 (post Covid) lbs, and can only bend my left knee 70 degrees or so comfortably - so I need to stretch out a bit. If I want to continue to ride I need a DCT or automatic and the stability of a 3-wheeler. I ride 70% 2-up with my wife who loves to ride. I sat on a '21 Spider Limited and it worked.

Questions:
  • How many of you have migrated from a 2-wheeler?
  • What was the transition like (in terms of ease and time to get comfortable)?
  • How does the experience change?
  • Do you miss the lean and 2-wheels?

Thanks so much,

David
David,

I’m a 75 year old 2020 RT owner and have owned more then 50 2 wheeled machines. I’ve been riding for over 60 years, and because of severe knee injuries can not safely operate a 2 wheeler any longer (to many “get offs” during my formative years 🤡😩. I’m 6’3” and weigh 250; so, we’re similar in build. If you have experience riding ATV’s or snowmobiles, the transition will be simple. Otherwise, take it slow and easy and you’ll pick up the necessary skills quickly.
 

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Background - long term 2-wheel rider (most recently BMW GSs, Triumphs, Hondas) - who has a bad knee after 5 surgeries (4 unnecessary if the first one had worked). Sigh. But that is the case and I am where I am. I am 6'2", 240 (post Covid) lbs, and can only bend my left knee 70 degrees or so comfortably - so I need to stretch out a bit. If I want to continue to ride I need a DCT or automatic and the stability of a 3-wheeler. I ride 70% 2-up with my wife who loves to ride. I sat on a '21 Spider Limited and it worked.

Questions:
  • How many of you have migrated from a 2-wheeler?
  • What was the transition like (in terms of ease and time to get comfortable)?
  • How does the experience change?
  • Do you miss the lean and 2-wheels?

Thanks so much,

David
I rode a Harley Road King but I had the same problems you did as I got older I was having a problem with the 2 up riding. I still miss the road king but I've gotten used to the SPYDER. My wife loves it but you need to be aware of your speed till you get used to it. It took me about 500 miles to learn to trust it! Off camber corners are tricky especially when they have bumps in them. One thing I've learned is to COUNTERSTEER. I find if I use pressure on the opposite grip to turn it (left pressure to turn right) I can be smoother through the turn. If I try and use both hands to turn it tends to start wobbling the steering back and forth. I'm currently turning an old Valkyrie into a bobber 4 when I'm by myself!
 

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I traded my 2013 BMW 1200RT for a used 2015 Can Am RT Limited around 3 years ago. I was on my 2nd BMW at the time and it took around 6 months for me to get used to riding my "nearly a motorcycle". Today I really enjoy it and at age 71 I think it is a better choice for me. I miss the beemers but I also miss being age 50. I believe you will adapt just fine and keep those fond memories of your youth when you laid the bike on it's side to carve your way through the twisty's.
 

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Background - long term 2-wheel rider (most recently BMW GSs, Triumphs, Hondas) - who has a bad knee after 5 surgeries (4 unnecessary if the first one had worked). Sigh. But that is the case and I am where I am. I am 6'2", 240 (post Covid) lbs, and can only bend my left knee 70 degrees or so comfortably - so I need to stretch out a bit. If I want to continue to ride I need a DCT or automatic and the stability of a 3-wheeler. I ride 70% 2-up with my wife who loves to ride. I sat on a '21 Spider Limited and it worked.

Questions:
  • How many of you have migrated from a 2-wheeler?
  • What was the transition like (in terms of ease and time to get comfortable)?
  • How does the experience change?
  • Do you miss the lean and 2-wheels?

Thanks so much,

David
Rode 2 wheels for many years. Honda, Harley, Triumph, etc. Bought my 2012 Spyder RT Limited a couple years ago. After I got used to it in a few hundred miles I will never go back to 2 wheels for riding pavement. For riding to up it is much more stable and fun, no comparison. My first test ride really creeped me out, my second one was less scary. I test drove this spider at another dealer and when I brought it back in, he said I was writing it wrong, he said trust the machine. I said what do you mean? He said get on behind me. He took me down a back road like a bat out of hades, cut through some gravel‘s and scared the dickens out of me. But when we got back, I was a believer. I bought it and rode it about 25 miles home. I don’t need any practice shifting gears and finally quit trying to lean. For me it’s 90% of the motorcycling experience with 10% of the stress or worry.
Background - long term 2-wheel rider (most recently BMW GSs, Triumphs, Hondas) - who has a bad knee after 5 surgeries (4 unnecessary if the first one had worked). Sigh. But that is the case and I am where I am. I am 6'2", 240 (post Covid) lbs, and can only bend my left knee 70 degrees or so comfortably - so I need to stretch out a bit. If I want to continue to ride I need a DCT or automatic and the stability of a 3-wheeler. I ride 70% 2-up with my wife who loves to ride. I sat on a '21 Spider Limited and it worked.

Questions:
  • How many of you have migrated from a 2-wheeler?
  • What was the transition like (in terms of ease and time to get comfortable)?
  • How does the experience change?
  • Do you miss the lean and 2-wheels?

Thanks so much,

David
I have similar 2 wheel experience, Honda, Harley, Triumph, etc. My 1st Spyder test ride was scary, 2nd one a year later less so, my 3rd one at another dealer was more comfortable. Yet the dealer told me to trust the Spyder and relax. He got on and told me to jump on behind. He tore out like a bat out of hades down a backroad, turned a donut in a gravel lot and shot back down the road, scaring the daylights out of me. When we returned, he said you can trust it. I bought the used 2012 Spyder RT Limited and rode it home. After a few hundred miles it was 2nd nature. Riding 2 up it is stable and worry free. On pavement now I wouldn't want anything else. It’s 90% of the motorcycle experience with 10% of the worry. My wife hated riding with me, now she loves it. Yes I tried to keep leaning for a short while, didn’t hurt, just unnecessary. It is very easy to ride. A couple years on the Spyder now and I’ll never go back. IMHO You won’t be sorry.
 

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One thing I've learned is to COUNTERSTEER. I find if I use pressure on the opposite grip to turn it (left pressure to turn right) I can be smoother through the turn.
Yes, most Spyder owners find that pushing on the outside bar end in a turn works better.
But that is NOT the definition of "countersteering".
 

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Yes I tried to keep leaning for a short while, didn’t hurt, just unnecessary.
Actually it is good to still lean into the corners a bit.
But for an entirely different reason.
Should you hit an unexpected bump in the middle of a "hot" corner, you will be less likely to fly off the high side if you are leaning in.
 

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For me it’s 90% of the motorcycling experience with 10% of the stress or worry.
YES! This totally sums up my/our experience too.

With a history of scooters through full-dress Harley touring bikes, we are now on a Sypder. The wife and I love it. All the bike experience and far less stress.

We go everywhere and anywhere with it - including lots of places I wouldn't have attempted on two wheels. We can pull over anywhere with ease to take photos (our thing) and then just as easily continue on our way. And you can pull up to the [insert name of place with dangerous edge/overlook/waterline you can't cross], admire the view, and then back-up to continue on your way! :)

It took a few rides before I got the feel of the Spyder because it is NOT the same as a bike. But now I feel so planted and stable on the road that there is quite literally no road or destination that gives me any worry. And even better, it TOTALLY feels like we are just as visible to traffic as cars. The bike is wide and you sit higher so their visibility of you is significantly better. People are still crappy drivers, but I feel far less vulnerable.

And, David, if you're getting serious about the bike, I would suggest you toss your dealer some money to hold onto it for you and give you more time to research and think. Supplies of bikes seems to be very complicated right now so waiting too long might mean you end up without a bike until mid-Summer.

Steven
 

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I still ride with 2 wheels but my wife has a Spyder F3-S. This was her first and only bike.
Personally, I love riding it. It is pretty fast and will kill my 111 Indian Classic. It takes some getting used to when coming from 2 wheels mostly due to the Spyder not leaning.
When you turn north, your body wants to go south. This feeling is odd until you get used to it. It's very important you lean hard into your corners and when turning left, push hard on your right foot and when turning right, press on your left foot. This greatly reduces the feeling you will fly off LOL.
The Spyder handles the twistiness like no one's business. It is very stable and fun to ride and I if I am ever not able to ride 2 wheels, I would get a Spyder. BTW, I have been riding for 40 years.
 
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