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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I said in my intro, I'm not yet a Spyder owner - still toying with the idea. One concern I have is the service & maintenance costs. Having experience with the traditional motorcycles, I can do some of the general service requirements. With the technology in this machine though, I'm wondering...Is it still something that can be serviced, within reason of course, in the home garage? I'm seeing that oil changes are a DIY thing but the rest...? Only a couple dealers from these within a reasonable distance and 1 I'll avoid as much as possible so being able to stay out of the shop is a BIG benefit.
I gotta believe insurance costs are higher than usual so that's something I'm going to call on and check for myself.
 

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it depends on what kind of servicing you want to do?

it is best to let the dealer do the first 2/3 as they replace a bunch of stuff and make sure everything is doing what it's supposed to, but they are expensive.

in reality anything to do with Spyders is more than likey more expensive than normal bikes one reason is all the plastic as in most cases something has to come off to do just about anything on it. plus the fact they are still considered a new kind of specialty bike so there are not a lot of places to get them fixed and parts are expensive ( stock and after market )

eventually if you want you can do most basic maintenance if you want. if you are going to add mods then most you can do yourself also, just plan on it taking a bit longer trying to figure out how the jigsaw puzzle comes apart and goes back together.

as for insurance I can't really address that as I live in Western Canada and all motorcycle insurance is expensive here, the Spyder is no different than a big Goldwing or Harley
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! Hadn't realized the body panels were such a puzzle to take off and put back on. Time cost $ so yeah, I can see that adding to the service costs when necessary. These bikes seem to have a god track record as far as time in the shop goes so that's a plus for the owners. :) My brother worked at two different dealerships and is quite versatile in the motorcycle area as far as repairs and such. More worried about all the technology (electronics) on these more than the mechanical aspect.

Thanks again. Any and all feedback is appreciated by this newbie. :eek:
 

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hehe

I see you have not read some of the horror stories yet, but I think it's just like any other vehicle . some people seem to have nothing but issues and others don't

the bike has some issues that most peole have figured out how to get around, but like anything else you deal with them or get something else

the electronics actually make the Spyder the safest bike on the road today there are things you can do on just about any other bike, but it won't allow you to do them on it. "Granny/Nanny" takes a bit of getting used to but once you figure her out, then almost anything is possible on them

if you have ridden a regular " fall 'em off " bike then the Spyder takes a bit of getting used to as it handles totally different than any other bike including a normal trike
 

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I've had one horror story, but love the bike. My wife would not go out on 2 wheels at all. 3 wheels is a much different story though. Also the comfort of the RT's is hard to beat for long distance.

Much of the normal service details are in the owners manual just waiting to be looked up. The Rotax engine has a long history and is pretty bullet proof.

Just make sure that you keep up to date on the factory recalls and you should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you folks! Still learnin' and investigatin' these creatures. Seems it's a love it or hate it thing. Those that see themselves as motorcycle "purists" hate 'em those that ride 'em love 'em. While I'll admit that from the front it has a frog-like appearance, I'm looking more at comfort and ease of taking my son or wife for a ride which with the Bonneville is kinda difficult (solo seat, no pegs, etc) Still gotta convince myself to let part of one hobby go to make this jump and a purchase - that's the hardest part. :eek:
 

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try to take one for a couple of hour test drive, try to learn some of the weird things

then do your homework

I have never ridden a bike before in my life. but I would never ride a "fall 'em over " bike. For me the few issues the Spyder has out weigh the 10x as many issues that a regular bike can have

such as safety and comfort
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have no issues with what you call "fall 'em over" bikes. Been riding on two wheels for a loong, long time. No issues doing so. The Spyder would just be something different and allow me to bring my son. Current bike is set up for solo riding only and I do NOT like doubling up on 2 wheels unless the rider knows exactly what they're doing. Gonna try and get to a dealer soon.
 

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kewl

just keep in mind that it's NOT the same as a motorcycle it handles totally different, most people who ride normal bikes will tell you that they did not like it all

the first time at least, but after about 500 miles or so they get the hang of it
if you have ever ridden an ATV then you will get the general idea

good luck and have fun
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks again. I've talked with a couple folks and all said it's NOT like riding a real motorcycle. (no offense intended) have ridden and am quite comfortable on ATV - both 3 and 4 wheels types - and on snowmobiles. Figure with that behind me and the past and current bike experience, it'll be a relatively short and painless learning curve adapting to the nuances of the Spyder. Good to know this before ever getting on one so it's not a :p*surprise*:p
 

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very kewl

Most of us would more than likely agree once you test one for a couple of hours you will be after the better half to dig out the check book and buy new toys

WOO HOO !!!!!!!!!!

hehe

have fun
 

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Maintenance Costs

I had a 2008 used Spyder and just traded in on a 2012 Touring model. I had pretty good luck with the 2008 with no maintenance issues but did not like the drift that vehicle had if you were on straight aways. Can Am has seemed to have fixed that issue with the newer models. However, I was very shocked with the 600 mile requirement that you must bring the bike back to a qualified Can Am dealer to be checked out. The 600 mile check up and oil change cost me $392 (the parts alone were $120). Then there is a 3000 mile required oil changes...at approximately $400 dollars every 3000 miles...this is going to get expensive. I don't understand since as someone else posted the rotax motor is a proven design. I don't understand why it is so costly for maintenance. Additionally, if I have to bring the bike back at 600 miles it tells me that the manufacturer does not have confidence in their product. Since that requirement is a must for the warranty I believe the 600 mile check up should be complimentary.
 

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Blk,

I have both 2 wheels and 3. The Spyder is certainly a different feel than a real motorcycle. Key point, the Spyder doesn't lean, but that doesn't mean your body can't.

The computers/nanny do an admirable job controlling that tendency to lift the inner front tire but you can do a little to aid the nanny, roll your body position forward and a little over that inside tire (doesn't need to be exaggerated, just a few inches forward and a few inches over) and you'll have much better stability. This motion will also counteract that feeling that the bike is trying to throw you off backwards and to the outside of the turn. Should be real familiar to snowmobile riding.

Very high speed cornering sees more MC riding involvement, get your rear off the seat by about half a cheek and pretend you're trying to drag a knee and the Spyder will corner like it's on rails.

Regarding maintenance costs, my 2010 has only been oil changes, inspections, and recalls. The standard service stuff is similarly priced to MC dealer pricing. Recalls have all been free. While you can probably do oil changes yourself, I take mine to the dealer. Step one involves taking the front trunk off for easier access and seems like a lot of hassle. Takes my dealer a little over an hour to do the oil change and very basic inspection.

I want to say my dealer also offered a maintenance plan, something like $1200 at purchase time to cover all maintenance for the duration of the warranty.
 

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I had a 2008 used Spyder and just traded in on a 2012 Touring model. I had pretty good luck with the 2008 with no maintenance issues but did not like the drift that vehicle had if you were on straight aways. Can Am has seemed to have fixed that issue with the newer models. However, I was very shocked with the 600 mile requirement that you must bring the bike back to a qualified Can Am dealer to be checked out. The 600 mile check up and oil change cost me $392 (the parts alone were $120). Then there is a 3000 mile required oil changes...at approximately $400 dollars every 3000 miles...this is going to get expensive. I don't understand since as someone else posted the rotax motor is a proven design. I don't understand why it is so costly for maintenance. Additionally, if I have to bring the bike back at 600 miles it tells me that the manufacturer does not have confidence in their product. Since that requirement is a must for the warranty I believe the 600 mile check up should be complimentary.

Over here the 600 mile is standard on any bike bought brand new. It is predominantly a general 'tightness' and visual check, coupled with an oil change.

This oil change and visual check, is to ensure that there are no manufacturing defects, that's all - nothing cycnical.

However, over here it is included in the purchase price.

I also agree with what folk say about riding these things, I have been thirty years on motorbikes and when I got on this thing it scared the bejeezus out of me!! However now I have learned how to ride it properly and shift my body position as appropriate and use the gears more judiciously.. it is awesome! :D
 

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I have and still do ride a 2 wheeler. We also have a 2011 TR-S. Over Memorial Day weekend we took a trip to the Tail of the Dragon in North Carolina/Tennesse. We live in Oklahoma. It was a 2000 mile 3 day weekend trip. During those first 300 miles of the trip, I was ready to trade it for a Touring Bike of some kind, but the dealer in Russelville, AR was already closed. I was not pleased with the Spyder, but the more I rode it, the more comfortable I got and the more I liked it. By the time we got to the Dragon Tail, I was comfortable enough on the Spyder that I could take the curves as good as the other touring bikes. Coming back home on Monday, we left NC at 6:30 AM and pulled into the driveway at 11:00 PM, that's 900 miles. I don't think we could have done that on my 2 wheeler. The Spyder is a very comfortable and easy to ride machine once you convince yourself it is NOT a motorcycle and can't be ridden like one. Besides toasting my right foot with the hot air coming from the side of the machine, it was a very good trip.
 

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I'm sort of the opposite. I've never been on a 2-wheeler. Now that I've been two years on the Spyder I've gotten the bug to try a real bike. That means taking the motorcycle course (which I don't have time for right now), and coming up with the money for a bike (which I won't have until the Spyder is paid off). This translates as "Not happening anytime soon." But I hear a Yahama Striker calling my name . . .
 
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