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So I have about 1K miles on my RS... I've been experimenting with some different things and was wondering what other folks have found that works for them when riding this beastie...

Coming from the 2-wheel world, obviously counter-steering is not the key! What I've been trying is to actually shift my weight to the inside of the turn (as centrifugal force pushes your body out/off the bike) to weight myself and the bike better.

I've had brief moments of "OH!! There it is!!" only to lose it again. I'm cutting myself some slack and remembering when I first started riding 2-wheels and how everything felt so foreign... after 10 years, I figured it out so am thinking it's like starting over again.

Any tips? Guidance? Thoughts? Suggestions? :)
 

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First thing...relax! Let the machine do it's thing. No death grips needed.

Second, when going into a tight turn I've found that shifting my weight first then steering into the turn makes for smooth in and out. Like regular two wheels excellerate out of the turn.

Third, then making that turn imagine trying to kiss the inside handlebar. That is the perfect ryding position to make a nice smooth clean turn.

Ryding styles will differ, it best to do a little moving around on the seat to find what works for you so you're feeling in control of the machine become second nature allowing you to enjoy the ryde.:D
 

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I've just done a few months ago a 1,500 mile trip across México, going thru a zillion curve highway called "El Espinazo del Diablo" (Devil's backbone) on the mountains between Durango and Mazatlán, and there I could practice all of this "shifting your weight thing" that, believe me, it makes a real difference between enjoying your Spyder or going fighting with it. (If someone comes from riding ATV's, it's more likely, and you get used to it quickly).

I also discovered in this steep hills and sharp curves, what really mean all of those initials, VSS, SCS, TCS, ABS, that they presume in the manual. All of that stability systems totally keep you in control. In two or three curves that I almost missed for going too fast, the Spyder did it's work, reducing torque on the outside wheel so I could keep on track. You even think that something's wrong, cause you feel a sudden, even brusque, loose of power, but that's crucial for keeping you on the road.

...Excuse me if I hurt some feelings, but this machine makes everyone eligible for the open road.
 

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First thing...relax! Let the machine do it's thing. No death grips needed.

Second, when going into a tight turn I've found that shifting my weight first then steering into the turn makes for smooth in and out. Like regular two wheels excellerate out of the turn.

Third, then making that turn imagine trying to kiss the inside handlebar. That is the perfect ryding position to make a nice smooth clean turn.

Ryding styles will differ, it best to do a little moving around on the seat to find what works for you so you're feeling in control of the machine become second nature allowing you to enjoy the ryde.:D
All excellent suggestions.
As well it's important to not look at the inside wheel and its relationship to the edge of the road. It's a natural place to look but is exactly the wrong place to look. You'll be much smoother in the turn if you look thru the corner to the exit.
 

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