Can-Am Spyder Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
I'm doing research into getting a trike for me. My husband got his 1st bike this year after we took the MSF. I didn't complete the MSF because it was too fast paced for me and I wrenched my knee after falling off the bike several times. My husband is adamant I will get my own ride and we've been looking at the spyder as an option since I can't get the hang of the clutch. A trike would give me the stability I need since I'm mildly disabled. I'd like to know the good and bad point of the spyder before I attempt to find a local dealer. Can you guys advise me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
First of all, in most states if not all, you will need a motorcycle endorsement on your drivers license to ride a Spyder.

As to riding, you use many of the same skills as riding on a 2 wheeler as far as safe riding goes. You need to look out and be aware of your surroundings. Just like a 2 wheeler, on a Spyder if someone hits you or pulls out in front of you in a car, you will get injured much more than if your were in a car. Always wear protective gear.

Differences that I have noticed include:
- larger frontal area on the Spyder make it "twitchy" in traffic or when it is windy. It will move around in the lane at highway speeds when overtaking or being overtaken. The RT models are worse than the RS in this aspect.
- Spyders are as wide as small cars. Watch your lane position. It is really easy to put a wheel outside of your lane or into a curb. Don't try to ride side-by-side with another motorcycle, the lanes are not wide enough. You have to ride in a stagger formation which is more safe anyway.
- the anti-lock brakes are wonderful. You brake hard while still maneuvering.
- Spyders have plenty of power for most people. The engine loves to rev. Don't be afraid of over revving, the engine will stop you before you hurt it. Also, don't lug the engine. I keep it above 3,000 - 3,500 RPMs
- the SE5 transmission is a dream to ride. You still have to shift, but the clutch is automatic.
- Spyders will tire you out just like other motorcycles. It takes more effort to ride a motorcycle than to drive a car. Windy days and twisty road require even more effort. But don't be afraid, it will take some getting used to on a Spyder. Take shorter rides to get used to it.
- Spyders have more storage than most traditional motorcycles. Take it on errands. The RT model will hold an enormous amount of "stuff".

If at all possible, take one for a test ride. Even if it is just in a parking lot, it will help you get a feel for the experience.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,861 Posts
Welcome to the Party, Kat! :D
Have you ever ridden ATVs? The Spyders feel much more like one of them out on the road at speed than they do a motorcycle...:cool:
The SE 5 tansmission won't keep you from having to shift, but it takes the clutch out of the equation so it's much easier to learn!
I wouldn't let the adventure of learning something new intimidate you... II bought my RT after never even having SAT on one of them. 2 miles out of the dealership on my way home I was having SERRIOUS doubts until I remebered that Bombardier (BRP: the parent Company) knows how to build some pretty fun machines. I relaxed a bit, loosened my grip and the Spyder starting tracking straight and true and I haven't regretted a moment since!

You probably will want to take an MSF course with the Spyder since they will teach you not only about the physical apsects of operation, but the mental awareness that is needed to make it a safe and enjoyable sport for all!



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
Welcome, Kat!

I had trouble getting the hang of the clutch and shifting, and I, too, dropped the bike several times at the MSF class. I wasn't sure I was ever going to learn how to ride, but eventually (after quite a bit of practice and plenty of patience on my husband's part!) became proficient enough to ride in traffic and on roads I'd not traveled before.

When I discovered the Spyder, I knew I wanted one. Did some research, then ran across a used 2008 RS SM5 (sporty model, manual transmission). I haven't looked back, and during riding weather its pretty hard to pry me off of mine.

Having said that, I agree with the guys ^ up there. They've given a lot of good advice. I'd also add that it takes a couple weeks to get a feel for riding a Spyder; they're not like anything you've ever ridden before, even if you have been on ATVs before.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top