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I am a new owner here in Texas and have a few questions. I have been on 2 wheels for several years and owned a Harley Trike for a short time. The main question I have is that the bike seems to go side to side as I am going down the road. I ride a lot of country roads since I live in the country and that is were I seem to have the most problems. I didn't know if it was me or something else I need to have checked.
 

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Alas, it is mostly you.....probably.

Your subconscious brain "thinks" you are on a 2 wheeled motorcycle and causes some automatic things to happen with your bar input and subtle weight shifts. Unfortunately those learned automatic things don't achieve the desired results when on 3 wheels.

It essentially is that you are over-reacting to sensory inputs without even knowing it.
It is worse on old 2 lane roads because they often have a certain amount of "wave" to the pavement surface.
It is made even worse because your back tire is constantly trying to "fall off of" the hump in the center of the lane caused by pavement wear.

It took me near to a year to "unlearn" the automatic riding style that I had developed over 50 years on 2 wheels.

Along the way, I found a few things that helped:
Keeping the front tires at exactly the same pressure......as much as possible.
Getting a laser alignment at a shop that has the proper equipment.
A different set of tires......NOT the OEM brand.
 

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Alas, it is mostly you.....probably.

Your subconscious brain "thinks" you are on a 2 wheeled motorcycle and causes some automatic things to happen with your bar input and subtle weight shifts. Unfortunately those learned automatic things don't achieve the desired results when on 3 wheels.

It essentially is that you are over-reacting to sensory inputs without even knowing it.
It is worse on old 2 lane roads because they often have a certain amount of "wave" to the pavement surface.
It is made even worse because your back tire is constantly trying to "fall off of" the hump in the center of the lane caused by pavement wear.

It took me near to a year to "unlearn" the automatic riding style that I had developed over 50 years on 2 wheels.

Along the way, I found a few things that helped:
Keeping the front tires at exactly the same pressure......as much as possible.
Getting a laser alignment at a shop that has the proper equipment.
A different set of tires......NOT the OEM brand.
I agree with everything said above. It takes a while to unlearn the two wheel traits you have. You didn't say what year your Spyder is. Many have a looser front end. This can be fixed with a baja ron sway bar. On the new 2020 RTL which I have, this problem is much less. :tango_face_smile_bi
 

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You likely need to install a BAJA RON sway bar to better stabilize the bike. Also don't use a tight grip on the handle bar, lighten up and you will no longer go "side to side". Tire pressure as stated does need to be within .5psi of each other and try to be at 19 or 20 psi. This has worked very well for me.

2018 Spyder RT LTD
 

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After motorcycling for many years and transitioning to a Spyder I had the same problem. After you read it a little more, come to trust the machine and that it really is stable, I think everything will be just fine. It was for me after I got used to it. I love it now, I’ll never go back. It’s the only way to ride especially with passenger.
 

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What the other posters have said about laser alignment and beefed up sway bar are spot on, as are the comments about having front tire pressure as close to exactly equal as possible are spot on. Yes, the OEM tires are crap; however if they are properly balanced you can wear them our and replace them with automobile tires. If your Spyder is correctly aligned, has a good heavier duty sway bar and well balanced front tires, AND you ride with a light touch on the bars as recommended your Spyder will track like an arrow shot from a crossbow.

If you haven't thoroughly read your operator's guide and watched the video that should have come with it you should do so as there is a wealth of information in both sources.
 

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Spyderpops.com is the place to get the swaybar from. He is the man that designed them an he sells other things too.
 

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I have to agree. Although I haven't had a laser alignment, I did get a heavy duty sway bar fitted and it has made quite a bit of difference. It handles so much better through off camber corners and rough roads.
And yes, tyre pressures also make a huge difference. I was going to get the shocks changed but my dealer suggested the sway bar option first. Glad I did as I don't believe I will worry about the shocks for the moment.
 

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I recommend that before changing sway bars and playing with tire air pressure you should visit spyderlovers.com, go to the General Discussion page and read "Do's and Do Nots" for new Spyder owners... It is very helpful when transitioning from a 2 wheel to the Spyder.

After you have ridden several hundred miles you will lose your 2 wheel muscle memory and really begin to enjoy the Spyder riding experience. When that occurs you can determine whether a sway bar change is necessary, begin to change tire pressure (something I never did), change from Kendra tires to car tires (this alone made a great difference in the handling of my 2014 RT Ltd), etc. An alignment is always recommended so google ROLO and find a location that will align Spyders. As far as buying a sway bar why not buy it direct from Bajaron?

Safe Riding!!
 

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LISpyder:
Good post.

BUT the front tire pressures really NEED to be as close to the same as possible, regardless of what tires are on there.
It is also important to NOT deviate from the recommended pressures by much.
 

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I have to agree. Although I haven't had a laser alignment, I did get a heavy duty sway bar fitted and it has made quite a bit of difference. It handles so much better through off camber corners and rough roads.
And yes, tyre pressures also make a huge difference. I was going to get the shocks changed but my dealer suggested the sway bar option first. Glad I did as I don't believe I will worry about the shocks for the moment.
Hi Davidn58, I went the other way and fitted suspension and decided against the sway bar for now. I friend also has an RTL like mine with both Elka's and sway bar, and I want to ride his first before I make the call on the sway bar. The valving in the Wilburs does a great job of keeping it even in corners. I'd be keen to hear if you go to Aftermarket shocks too of what you think (NSW Hunter Valley)
 

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Here is my advice. I have had 3 can-ams now. Unless you have a 2020 or newer, you're going to need the Baja Ron sway bar. It's a must! The new bike is much tighter and handles much better and is not needed. Believe me, I had the entire front end rebuilt to get a 2016 to ride right.
 
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