Can-Am Spyder Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a used FT-3 with 9000 miles on it. After riding two wheelers for 20 years I was quite naturally a little anxious over the tendency of the bike to dart back and forth in some situations. After watching many You Tube videos before I bought a Can Am, I am left wondering if the bike needs an alignment. I cant use only one hand on the bars.

I read up on the Laser Alignment process and they describe what I am sensing in the handling as “bump darting”. According to their philosophy the factory lines up the wheels t the frame while the Laser Alignment lines the front wheels to the back wheel for proper “thrust angle” determination.

I am waiting for an appointment at the lone Dealer here in Louisiana to have this work done.

Any more experienced Spyder riders care to comment on this issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
You described "bump steer". That's not necessarily an alignment issue. Make sure that the suspension is adjusted for your weight too. There also may be an aftermarket anti-sway bar in your future.
 

·
Super Moderator
'17 RT Limited
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
I cant use only one hand on the bars.

Any more experienced Spyder riders care to comment on this issue?
What exactly are you saying with that first statement ?

The 3 wheel geometry of a Spyder makes it FEEL worse than it really IS.
Those who have never ridden much on 2 wheels don't seem to have as much of a problem "adapting".
But CanAm's version of front wheel alignment makes matters worse.
So yes, a proper laser alignment should help.
So should keeping the tire pressures up to the recommendation.
So should getting a good set of "car" tires to replace the soft cheap stock Kenda's.

BUT "time in the seat" along with relaxing your grip and not over-reacting to tactile inputs from the road and winds is the only REAL solution.
Some adapt quickly. Some take longer.
For me, it was about 3 months and a couple of thousand miles.......along with alignment and tires.

Oh, and an "old" skill of looking THROUGH turns and corners helped a lot too after I practiced that again for a while.
You can even practice that in your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Maybe this is an issue only with older Spyders. I'm new to Spyders after 30 years on two wheels. My 2021 RT does not wander or bump or give me any surprises at all. Other than getting used to steering instead of leaning, the biggest adaption to the Spyder was stopping reaching for a front brake lever. It took me about an hour, and 40 miles of riding, to get comfortable with this 3 wheeler. I wonder if newbies are a bit predisposed to be hyper sensitive to the ride of a Spyder because of so much online discussion about wandering or other control issues. Or maybe its just because mine is a newer model. I keep the tire pressure at 2 pounds over the recommended, at 22 in front and 30 in the rear so maybe that is helping as well.
 

·
Super Moderator
'17 RT Limited
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
I keep the tire pressure at 2 pounds over the recommended, at 22 in front and 30 in the rear so maybe that is helping as well.
Yes that will help.
And part of the problem has been solved on new models with:
Different OEM tires
A somewhat stiffer sway bar
Maybe better shocks
Hopefully a better alignment from the factory
BUT.............
I quite assure you that most of the problem is retraining your BRAIN to react differently than it did for so many years on 2 wheels.
Some people have no trouble at all. Some have a LOT of trouble. No two people are exactly alike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Bought mine in Reno NV used from dealer had to ride it 60miles home in freeway traffic I'm 80 years young and a worrywort so was a nervous wreck as I had just road it in dealer parking lot about five minutes and took off for home after 30 miles was off freeway and on less traveled road had got more used to controls and relaxed . Had it about 40 days after riding it for couple day on short runs of about 50 miles average each every day I'm really comfortable .one thing I found out on cornering win it feels like Turning is Fighting you just roll on a little throttle it turns right in even helps on 90degree turn from a stop in town .just throwing this in because have not seen that said in any post keep riding and shiny side
 

·
Super Moderator
'17 RT Limited
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
I found out on cornering win it feels like Turning is Fighting you just roll on a little throttle it turns right in even helps on 90degree turn from a stop in town .just throwing this in because have not seen that said in any post keep riding and shiny side
Good point.
I have always had some trouble properly gauging my entry speed on corners; I tend to enter too hot.
When you do that, rolling ON the throttle is hard to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I just bought a used FT-3 with 9000 miles on it. After riding two wheelers for 20 years I was quite naturally a little anxious over the tendency of the bike to dart back and forth in some situations. After watching many You Tube videos before I bought a Can Am, I am left wondering if the bike needs an alignment. I cant use only one hand on the bars.

I read up on the Laser Alignment process and they describe what I am sensing in the handling as “bump darting”. According to their philosophy the factory lines up the wheels t the frame while the Laser Alignment lines the front wheels to the back wheel for proper “thrust angle” determination.

I am waiting for an appointment at the lone Dealer here in Louisiana to have this work done.

Any more experienced Spyder riders care to comment on this issue?
Sway bar helps. Much like darting on snowmobile. After 4 spyders and 150000mi you get used to it. When on crowned roads pick a side to drive on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Bought mine in Reno NV used from dealer had to ride it 60miles home in freeway traffic I'm 80 years young and a worrywort so was a nervous wreck as I had just road it in dealer parking lot about five minutes and took off for home after 30 miles was off freeway and on less traveled road had got more used to controls and relaxed . Had it about 40 days after riding it for couple day on short runs of about 50 miles average each every day I'm really comfortable .one thing I found out on cornering win it feels like Turning is Fighting you just roll on a little throttle it turns right in even helps on 90degree turn from a stop in town .just throwing this in because have not seen that said in any post keep riding and shiny side
Place wheel on white or yellow line depending on left or right turn, dip shoulder, shift weight and accelerate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I just bought a used FT-3 with 9000 miles on it. After riding two wheelers for 20 years I was quite naturally a little anxious over the tendency of the bike to dart back and forth in some situations. After watching many You Tube videos before I bought a Can Am, I am left wondering if the bike needs an alignment. I cant use only one hand on the bars.

I read up on the Laser Alignment process and they describe what I am sensing in the handling as “bump darting”. According to their philosophy the factory lines up the wheels t the frame while the Laser Alignment lines the front wheels to the back wheel for proper “thrust angle” determination.

I am waiting for an appointment at the lone Dealer here in Louisiana to have this work done.

Any more experienced Spyder riders care to comment on this issue?
I'm pretty new to Spyders as well. Bought a 2016 f3T a few months ago.
Rode two wheels for many years.
I am getting more used to the Spyder and enjoying it more. Most of my riding is at 60 mph or less. At freeway speeds it can be nerve wracking. Mine has the Bajaron sway bar. Tire pressures all correct. If on good smooth rides it's fine. If on older roads, it's a handful. I seem to be more relaxed at it but I also avoid the high speed roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Practice. You already have good gear on the front end. Make sure the tire pressures are right. And go faster. Cars around you passing you because your going 60 will make you flinch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Place wheel on white or yellow line depending on left or right turn, dip shoulder, shift weight and accelerate.
For 50 years of driving 2 wheeler I was always told the lines were slippery and to avoid riding on them. When did that change???
 

·
Super Moderator
'17 RT Limited
Joined
·
1,567 Posts
For 50 years of driving 2 wheeler I was always told the lines were slippery and to avoid riding on them. When did that change???
It didn't. It is not really good advice.
It is slightly less of a problem with 3 wheels.

"Putting one wheel on a line" pretty much requires you to be looking at the wrong place anyway.
Looking at the front wheel where it contacts the road is exactly the WRONG thing to be doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Dave Moss of the "2 Clicks Out" YouTube channel, who does race bike setup and gives advice to new track riders, always says "brake, turn then accelerate" to start with. OK, then on a bike you can get into trail braking and accelerating out of turns early, later on. I think for the Spyder it really reacts better to just brake, turn and accelerate. Trail braking seems to get mine all confused with too much roll, possibly because of the linked braking system. If I get all the braking done first which compresses the front evenly, then turn (I can even square off the corner a bit and I get less roll), then accelerate smoothly out - the whole plot seems stable, roll is kept to a minimum and it doesn't seem like I need a better sway bar or shocks. Probably not the ultimately fastest way to ride it, but it seems the most stable and enjoyable. Certainly no going in too hot gives me a better line through the corner and keeps the roll under control. This is what works best for me, especially two up.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top