Can-Am Spyder Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's important to keep your battery charged between rides. There are some parasitic drains even with the key off. Without a charger attached, the battery will lose voltage, and within about 4 weeks it would be totally flat. Any time a battery is discharged below it's resting voltage it is degrading, and it's life will be substantially shortened. Low battery voltage can also cause faults in complex electrical systems.

Whenever I park my Spyder, I plug in a fully automatic charger.

Assuming you have a sealed AGM battery, the charging voltage with the engine at fast idle will be about 14.0 - 14.1 v. With the engine off and a charger attached, it should be about 13.5 to 13.7 volts with a fully charged battery. If you disconnect the charger and let the battery rest, it will probably settle down to 12.7 v or so, but if you allow it to rest with no charger, it will slowly sink below 12v, and will begin to permanently lose capacity.

If your charger is older than four years, it very likely was designed with a charging voltage suitable for a wet battery, say 12.7v. If so, it will barely manage to keep a sealed AGM battery at minimum voltage, but not give it a good surface charge.

If you think your automatic charger is adequate, I suggest doing a check. Connect it and allow to charge for say 12 hours, then check the voltage with a digital voltmeter while it's connected. If the charging voltage is less than about 13.3 - 13.4 v, I suggest a newer charger. You might also disconnect the charger for 12 hrs. and let the battery drop to its resting voltage to see whether that's higher or lower than your charger voltage.

Both the ACI and the Optimate 4 chargers I obtained ealier this year have the appropriate charging voltage for AGM or Gel batteries (13.7v), plus the complex algorythms and amps needed to raise a sulfated battery from the dead.

I also have some Battery Doc chargers that are in the ballpark, for a few less bucks.

I'm not making any suggestions for brands, nor is this a complete charger comparison. I do suggest you obtain a reliable digital voltmeter (say Radio Shack 22-810) and do some checks before depending on any charger.

Voltage can be measured between the "hot" positive terminal (protected by the red plastic cap) under the seat, and the negative connector on the other side. Charging is a lot easier with a fused pigtail attached to these terminals and hanging down below the plastic panels, say with an SAE plug connection. You can buy SAE plug/fuse/wire kits at auto parts stores.

pmdave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Dave, thanks for a valuable tip. With all the computer power in the Spyder there's probably a higher than average drain on the battery when the bike is sitting idle. I just went out and hooked up my BMW/Battery Tender charger and will be checking the voltage as you suggested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Battery Drain

I was glad for the battery information, however what happens when you are on an extended trip and don't have access to re-charge the Spyder battery?
I have contacted BRP about this battery drain problem that has left us stranded a couple of times, but no response as of yet. We are on the second battery and still having the same problem. I owned Goldwings before and never had this problem. There should be no reason why you should have to charge the battery after 3 or 4 days of down time. I have talked with two different Spyder dealerships and they are at a loss.

My Spyder is a 2009 that I purchased new in 01/11 and I enjoy riding it, however I now have my doubts if they have the "bugs" worked out.

Currently I will be making arrangements for my third trip to the dealership and leaving it until the problem is resolved. We have even cancelled our trip to the Can-Am Spyder Event in Cherokee, NC as we are afraid of being stranded again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Battery access for 2009 RT Spyder

Can anyone explain how to access the battery on this particular year? I have found a YouTube video, and it shows a couple of screws that need to be removed...I don't have those screws!
Do I have to remove the whole side panel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Can anyone explain how to access the battery on this particular year? I have found a YouTube video, and it shows a couple of screws that need to be removed...I don't have those screws!
Do I have to remove the whole side panel?
You need to remove the rear side panel that the turning signal is attached to. To do this you need to remove the panel in front of that panel just so you can get to one torx screw that is under the edge of that panel. Also there are 3 torx screws under the panel behind the seat on the battery side of the spyder. Then there are 2 of the plastic rivets that you need to remove see page 91 in the owners manual. Be careful when you have the panel loose not to pull too hard on the wires to the turnsignal. Just lay it aside. to get to the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
I was wondering why mine came with a battery tender

Q I may leave my bike sitting for a day or two the most , do I have to still have to put it on the battery tender !

It just surprise me that BRP can make a out standing machine that's cost this much money and yet when they sell you the machine a battery tender comes with it . # 2 my sales rep never mention a battery issue and further more I never knew bout a tender included with my purchase . Dam I thought I did my home work before buying the sts , the last thing I want is to get stuck any where , like some one mention suppose I go camping and leave my unit park for couple days .

Who knows maybe BRP will make a high brid model !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Q I may leave my bike sitting for a day or two the most , do I have to still have to put it on the battery tender !

It just surprise me that BRP can make a out standing machine that's cost this much money and yet when they sell you the machine a battery tender comes with it . # 2 my sales rep never mention a battery issue and further more I never knew bout a tender included with my purchase . Dam I thought I did my home work before buying the sts , the last thing I want is to get stuck any where , like some one mention suppose I go camping and leave my unit park for couple days .

Who knows maybe BRP will make a high brid model !
As far as I know no Spyder comes with a battery tender.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Buy a Spyder from the motorcycle mall

As far as I know no Spyder comes with a battery tender.

I can assure you mines did , not only did it come with a new tender they wired it up with the receiving cable as I call it , when the sales rep deliver the bike and explaining every thing to me there it was in the frunk , a new battery tender . Which I still have in it's new plastic . Only cus I have two genders already !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Spyder Battery Tender

I bought my 2013 Spyder RT in Charleston, SC. The dealer told me that they automatically add the battery tender connector when they assemble the bike. It is located in the left front wheel well. The reason is that as they work on them in the store, it helps to keep the battery up. This is not something from BRP, but from the dealer. It is convenient for them and a nice perk for us. FYI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Explains my battery issues with my 5 hour old Spyder

We trailered it due to bad weather, bringing it home from the dealership. Went to drive it off the trailer and it was almost dead. The voltage was low enough that we couldn't do a thing with it. I'm kind of bummed that they know this and no one at the dealership said anything, and BRP hasn't fixed the issue. I too thought I had done my homework, and just happened across this when I signed up on the forum this morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
At the risk of angering the fates, I've not noticed this being a problem. Mine is an RS... does mine have less electronical (new, technical word) farkles vampiring the battery juice?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
We trailered it due to bad weather, bringing it home from the dealership. Went to drive it off the trailer and it was almost dead. The voltage was low enough that we couldn't do a thing with it. I'm kind of bummed that they know this and no one at the dealership said anything, and BRP hasn't fixed the issue. I too thought I had done my homework, and just happened across this when I signed up on the forum this morning.
Although the dealership did warn me about the battery issue I had no idea it was as bad as it really is! I have generally started the bike since getting it regularly but not really rode it any great distance and yesterday after a brief ride to a local store the check engine light came on when i was almost home. First the engine logo lit up,then the check engine warning blocked out my screen. I called the dealership and spoke with a mechanic and his first suggestion was the battery. I placed it on charge yesterday afternoon and checked it this morning and all seems fine now. Won't know for certain until I start it and ride it but I'm thinking that was the issue. I'mused to a Harley in that you can turn bike off and listen to the radio without fearing battery drain,guess thats a no go now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
I'mused to a Harley in that you can turn bike off and listen to the radio without fearing battery drain,guess thats a no go now.
My experience is a different one; usually I don't use my RT more often than maybe once a week. During winter, it may take two or three weeks until the weather conditions allow for a ride, while in summer I use it a bit more often, whilst never as a daily runner.

Having owned it for almost two years now, I never experienced any trouble arising from the battery. I have not used a battery tender yet and also I love to use the radio a lot whenever I'm parking up somewhere for a smoke or when I wash my RT.

Why is it we have such a wide range of experiences?

Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
At the risk of angering the fates, I've not noticed this being a problem. Mine is an RS... does mine have less electronical (new, technical word) farkles vampiring the battery juice?
The RS does not have all the "extra" stuff that the RT does and I have not noticed a significient drain on my 2010. Having said that I do keep the tender on mine when not in use. Had the battery checked this year as I am in year 4 and the technician said my battery checkes out just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
It's important to keep your battery charged between rides. There are some parasitic drains even with the key off. Without a charger attached, the battery will lose voltage, and within about 4 weeks it would be totally flat. Any time a battery is discharged below it's resting voltage it is degrading, and it's life will be substantially shortened. Low battery voltage can also cause faults in complex electrical systems.

Whenever I park my Spyder, I plug in a fully automatic charger.

Assuming you have a sealed AGM battery, the charging voltage with the engine at fast idle will be about 14.0 - 14.1 v. With the engine off and a charger attached, it should be about 13.5 to 13.7 volts with a fully charged battery. If you disconnect the charger and let the battery rest, it will probably settle down to 12.7 v or so, but if you allow it to rest with no charger, it will slowly sink below 12v, and will begin to permanently lose capacity.

If your charger is older than four years, it very likely was designed with a charging voltage suitable for a wet battery, say 12.7v. If so, it will barely manage to keep a sealed AGM battery at minimum voltage, but not give it a good surface charge.

If you think your automatic charger is adequate, I suggest doing a check. Connect it and allow to charge for say 12 hours, then check the voltage with a digital voltmeter while it's connected. If the charging voltage is less than about 13.3 - 13.4 v, I suggest a newer charger. You might also disconnect the charger for 12 hrs. and let the battery drop to its resting voltage to see whether that's higher or lower than your charger voltage.

Both the ACI and the Optimate 4 chargers I obtained ealier this year have the appropriate charging voltage for AGM or Gel batteries (13.7v), plus the complex algorythms and amps needed to raise a sulfated battery from the dead.

I also have some Battery Doc chargers that are in the ballpark, for a few less bucks.

I'm not making any suggestions for brands, nor is this a complete charger comparison. I do suggest you obtain a reliable digital voltmeter (say Radio Shack 22-810) and do some checks before depending on any charger.

Voltage can be measured between the "hot" positive terminal (protected by the red plastic cap) under the seat, and the negative connector on the other side. Charging is a lot easier with a fused pigtail attached to these terminals and hanging down below the plastic panels, say with an SAE plug connection. You can buy SAE plug/fuse/wire kits at auto parts stores.

pmdave
I have brought a F3-T Ltd 2016, I have had it for a month now and it has drained 2 batteries, I was wandering if anyone else with this model has had the same problem or have BRP fixed the problem since 2013 models, and it's just bad luck I have brought a dud?
Shell
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top