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Me and someone else weigh but 250 each and it bottomed out one time I thought I had air shocks but I called the dealer and they said the sharks automatically adjust to your weight is that right or white
 

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What year F3?
Is there a "tire valve stem" under the seat ??
Do you have an owners manual ?

I suggest that you visit a dealer for a quick inspection and to order an owners manual if you don't have one.

NOTE: If you really are saying that the total load was 500 pounds, that might be a bit OVER the max. rating.
 

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Agree with Easy Rider, need ride info and manuals are always good to have including the OEM service manual. The OEM service manual is not only to do your own wrenching, but for you to read about an issue and what is involved in the fix so that if you rely on a dealer to do the work, you are an informed customer.

The air ride system on an F3 Spyder does adjust to the weight on the Spyder, but this is predicated on what the air pressure is in the system, done manually. Unlike the RT Spyder that can have a remote air pressure adjust system. My 2014 RT LE air ride system can be adjusted remotely for solo and two up riding as I ride. I can feel the difference in the air ride for solo and two up riding on the same air pressure setting. The interval between air compressor cycles is longer when I ride solo, shorter when two up.

The GVW of a Spyder is approximately vehicle weight plus an additional 500 lbs that is rider/passenger/cargo - won't quibble over a few pounds. Two wheel motorcycles are approximately the same at motorcycle weight and an additional 450 lbs. Can't change the rated GVW no matter what is added to alleviate an issue.

Mention this on motorcycle forums I visit when the infamous car tire issue is heatedly discussed. Mention that there is not a two wheel motorcycle manufactured that has a towing capacity, nor is towing a trailer recommended by an OEM, and the GVW is quite often exceeded, but these two topics don't get the same response as putting a car tire on a two wheeler.

Having mentioned this, the Can-Am Spyder is the only "motorcycle" platform on the market that has a towing capacity of 400 lbs. The Harley Davidson trike from the factory does not, nor does any trike conversion. A trike conversion does not change the DOT/MOT, or OEM certified rating(s).

For your riding profile, I would recommend a rear shock upgrade with a 700/800 lb/in spring regardless of which Spyder you have, and the purchase of a trailer for touring. A trailer will allow you to minimize the cargo weight on the Spyder considering your riding profile mentioned. The new rear shock with a 700/800 lb/in spring rate should be sufficient for good solo riding, and use the air assist when two up. It will take a few solo and two up rides to dial in the requisite amount of air pressure in the air assist shock after you upgrade the rear shock.

You may want to consider a front shock upgrade as well. Generally when a front or rear shock upgrade is done, the best performance and ride quality is achieved by doing both. True with a Spyder and a two wheel motorcycle.

The rear shock system on a Spyder is similar to what I had on my ex-GL1500 Goldwing. A standard shock to support rider and motorcycle weight - OEM shock spring is generally too soft for the application, with an air assist shock to compensate for additional passenger weight and cargo. The standard shock should be capable of supporting the Spyder and rider weight with the minimum preload on the shock, and minimal air assist. The air assist shock should be used to compensate for added passenger and cargo weight.

My 1985 Honda Goldwing Limited Edition also has an air ride system that is similar. The rear suspension air pressure can be set for solo or two up riding and once set, the air ride system maintains the air pressure - plus or minus, to ensure a smooth, level and enjoyable ride. These air ride systems are not new.

Changing to a newer Spyder such as a 2021 still results in a GVW issue, and OEM spring rates. If you like your present ride, an investment of $1500.00 USD for a set of shocks front/rear - request the heavier rear spring rate, is a modest cost for improved ride quality and performance.

Long winded answer, hope this helps and it is just MHO. YMMV. Cheers
 

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The air ride system on an F3 Spyder does adjust to the weight on the Spyder, but this is predicated on what the air pressure is in the system, done manually.

Long winded answer, hope this helps and it is just MHO. YMMV. Cheers
Well that is probably the only sentence that really applies to his question.......and it seems to conflict with itself.
Which is it, automatic or manual ? It can't be both.

I think it is a strictly manual system on that model and does nothing automatically.
With a 500 LB load, it would need to be aired up to the max. allowed........and then hope there isn't a leak.
 

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The air ride systems work the same once the pressure is set. To set the pressure on the F3 you do it manually through a schrader valve - like a car tire, then the on board air ride system maintains this pressure. My RT LE has an as you ride air ride system. I can change the pressure when riding.

The rest of my previous post is information for consideration. From the author's question, it would seem that he will not get a good recommendation on the way ahead regarding a suspension upgrade/setup on the F3, so I added some additional information.

Cheers
 

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The air ride systems work the same once the pressure is set. To set the pressure on the F3 you do it manually through a schrader valve - like a car tire, then the on board air ride system maintains this pressure.
While I don't know for sure, I think that is not right.
How do you figure that the "on board" system can maintain the pressure if there is no compressor present ??
 

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I think you're are correct. I'm going to discuss this with Sonya's brother who has a 2018 F3 Limited. This would mean that you set the air pressure so that the air shock comes into play to assist the main non-air shock - no as-you-ride adjustment, very similar to the air ide system on a GL1500 Goldwing.

This still brings me back to the premise that the non-air shock should be capable of supporting the Spyder weight, and rider profile (solo riding, rider weight, and cargo) so that minimum shock preload and minimum air shock assistance is used to set the ride height. Once this is done, use the air shock to compensate for the pillion and any additional added weight. The issue here is that if the OEM rear shock on the F3 is similar to the OEM rear shock on my RT LE, there is no preload adjustment - will check. This would indicate that preload for determining proper ride height is dependent on the air shock.

The rear shock on an RT LE is not adjustable. The spring rate for most rider requirements may be adequate, but as the author of this thread has found, the OEM shock may not be great for all riding profiles. There is a thread on the Spyderlovers forum that details a shock spring mod to the rear shock. This is the thread: RT Limited OEM Rear Shock- Making it Adjustable. Good read and information.

Another more detailed/technical thread on this subject: 2012 RT-S SE5: Rear Suspension (shock) Theory is applicable all round.

As the author of this thread now knows, the onus to find out what is happening, or what is installed on his Spyder falls to him. Easy Rider has asked about the owner's manual, but the OEM service manual is a good addition to owning this Spyder if for nothing else then to answer a lot of questions one might have, and when you visit a dealer, you are now a very informed consumer.

Good luck and hope you resolve this issue to your satisfaction.

Cheers
 

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This still brings me back to the premise that the non-air shock should be capable of supporting the Spyder weight, and rider profile (solo riding, rider weight, and cargo) so that minimum shock preload and minimum air shock assistance is used to set the ride height.

This would indicate that preload for determining proper ride height is dependent on the air shock.
The shock does not "support" anything......unless the spring is also integrated upon it using the same mount points.
It is the spring that does the supporting.

The air system not only sets the spring pre-load but also adds some to the spring rate.
Calling it an "air shock" is unfortunate and somewhat misleading.
 
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