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I have 23 years experience riding a 2 wheeler but haven't ridden in almost 19 years. I just bought a 2014 RT Limited with 252 miles on it. So I think the bike is totally cool and my wife lives it. I mean she is the queen of queens sitting on the back of this thing. My old bike (1100 Yamaha Virago with a small back rest for her). Anyway even though I haven't ridden for 19 years I find myself going for the front break every now and then and low and behold, it's not there. The main things that is freaking me out is the curves, imperfections of the road surface and the wind. Turns are easy because you are going slow. I find that when I'm on a curve the bike is trying to throw me off (so much that I find myself pressing my knees into the body of the bike). I understand the physics and leaning really helps, but when I do I feel that I don't have as good of control of the throttle and because my breaking foot is supper planted I don't feel that I could break fast if I had to. Some roads are not level and of course the Spyder will pitch with the road. With a 2 wheeler, you are always upright. The problem I have with the wind also applies to the curves and uneven roads and that is that the steering is soooooo sensitive. I mean even at 45 or 50 if I just slightly turn the handles bars, the bike just goes in that direction a bit more than I would like and I am afraid of over steering . I'm thinking/hoping that as I get miles under by belt I will adapt. I will be 60 in January and have only rode this for about 200 miles. The first 50 miles when I rode it home was scary. Almost all heavy traffic and I had no idea what I was doing. Anyway any tips or thoughts would be very much appreciated.
 

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I have 23 years experience riding a 2 wheeler but haven't ridden in almost 19 years. I just bought a 2014 RT Limited with 252 miles on it. So I think the bike is totally cool and my wife lives it. I mean she is the queen of queens sitting on the back of this thing. My old bike (1100 Yamaha Virago with a small back rest for her). Anyway even though I haven't ridden for 19 years I find myself going for the front break every now and then and low and behold, it's not there. The main things that is freaking me out is the curves, imperfections of the road surface and the wind. Turns are easy because you are going slow. I find that when I'm on a curve the bike is trying to throw me off (so much that I find myself pressing my knees into the body of the bike). I understand the physics and leaning really helps, but when I do I feel that I don't have as good of control of the throttle and because my breaking foot is supper planted I don't feel that I could break fast if I had to. Some roads are not level and of course the Spyder will pitch with the road. With a 2 wheeler, you are always upright. The problem I have with the wind also applies to the curves and uneven roads and that is that the steering is soooooo sensitive. I mean even at 45 or 50 if I just slightly turn the handles bars, the bike just goes in that direction a bit more than I would like and I am afraid of over steering . I'm thinking/hoping that as I get miles under by belt I will adapt. I will be 60 in January and have only rode this for about 200 miles. The first 50 miles when I rode it home was scary. Almost all heavy traffic and I had no idea what I was doing. Anyway any tips or thoughts would be very much appreciated.
I feel the exact same way with mine. Not sure what to do about it besides more seat time. Scary as hell. Have you found anything that helps yet?
 

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Only 23 years. What a newby.:D

WRT fast turn-in, what greatly improved mine (which was treacherous) was Vredestein Quatrac 5 tires although others also have been recommended. If you still have the stock Kendas and especially if they are 5 years old you absolutely need to replace them.

BTW bumpsteer seems to have been designed into the suspension.:D

Yeah the absence of a front brake is bothersome (the fingertips of my gloves always wore out first) and foot-brake-only will probably be my downfall too. But my Spyder is doing what I bought it for -- long freeway commutes after a long day working on cars and stuff.

After 4K miles I still haven't fully adapted to staying in the center of the lane (that's where the grease line is/was) but I'm working on it. And placing the front wheels where I want them is still a struggle because they are offset from the riding position (car drivers pretty much sit aligned with the inner edge of the wheel which really helps with placement).

I really like the 1330cc I3 engine and the 6-speed paddle-shifted transmission. And the electronics are pretty smart so let them do the work. And to reward those electronics give them a new high quality battery (I use Shorai LFX) every 3 years.

You bought a 7-year-old motorcycle with almost no use. As you probably know, that can be hard on seals, etc. So change ALL fluids! No exceptions! And change them NOW!

Once you get a bit of new worn off, you need some farkles. There are a number of vendors who offer trunk liners, etc to help with keeping your stuff (and there's always stuff) organized. And with 2-up riding, you will probably want a suspension upgrade. Based on your Virago experience (apparently good) my assessment is BajaRon's front shock adjusters and swaybar will probably be adequate and certainly best value for money.

In summary, you will love the engine and transmission. There is no way a 3-wheeler will have the best handling aspects of a 2-wheeler or a 4-wheeler -- get over it. And the brake pedal? Keep working on that.

Best wishes.(y)
 

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I feel the exact same way with mine. Not sure what to do about it besides more seat time. Scary as hell. Have you found anything that helps yet?
Yes. IF the main problem is that it feels like it is wandering all over the road and you tend to "oversteer" in the turns.
New tires. NOT the OEM Kendas.
Laser alignment.
Spirited riders like a stiffer sway bar.
Front tire pressures equal and up to recommendation.
(That does NOT mean the max. pressure on the sidewall.)

But the rider really IS the most important part.

Loose grip on the bars. As much as possible, let the Spyder track a straight line by itself.
Try not to over-react (or react at all most of the time) to feelings that it is turning on it's own.
One wheel can go over a bump or dip and tilt the rider slightly.......but still maintain a straight line without any help from you.

And then some basics no matter how many wheels you have:
Lean into the curves a bit. For a different reason but it just feels better.
Look THROUGH curves and not at the road immediately ahead.
Many riders don't learn this on 2 wheels either.

And finally, if you ride a lot on asphalt roads that are old enough to have "tracks" worn down where the tires usually run, then ONE of your Spyder tires will almost always be on the top or side of a ridge in the road. THAT makes it VERY difficult to "feel" how the bike is tracking. This most often happens with the rear and is a whole new feeling.

Many short rides with a day in between is better for learning than LONG rides out on the road.
 

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Based on your Virago experience (apparently good) my assessment is BajaRon's front shock adjusters and swaybar will probably be adequate and certainly best value for money.
And I think those should be the LAST things you do unless you are a "spirited" rider.
If most of your miles are in a straight line on relatively good roads, that probably won't help much or any.
I noticed NO difference with a swaybar change.
 

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Yes. IF the main problem is that it feels like it is wandering all over the road and you tend to "oversteer" in the turns.
New tires. NOT the OEM Kendas.
Laser alignment.
Spirited riders like a stiffer sway bar.
Front tire pressures equal and up to recommendation.
(That does NOT mean the max. pressure on the sidewall.)

But the rider really IS the most important part.

Loose grip on the bars. As much as possible, let the Spyder track a straight line by itself.
Try not to over-react (or react at all most of the time) to feelings that it is turning on it's own.
One wheel can go over a bump or dip and tilt the rider slightly.......but still maintain a straight line without any help from you.

And then some basics no matter how many wheels you have:
Lean into the curves a bit. For a different reason but it just feels better.
Look THROUGH curves and not at the road immediately ahead.
Many riders don't learn this on 2 wheels either.

And finally, if you ride a lot on asphalt roads that are old enough to have "tracks" worn down where the tires usually run, then ONE of your Spyder tires will almost always be on the top or side of a ridge in the road. THAT makes it VERY difficult to "feel" how the bike is tracking. This most often happens with the rear and is a whole new feeling.

Many short rides with a day in between is better for learning than LONG rides out on the road.
Ok thank you
 

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Yes. IF the main problem is that it feels like it is wandering all over the road and you tend to "oversteer" in the turns.
New tires. NOT the OEM Kendas.
Laser alignment.
Spirited riders like a stiffer sway bar.
Front tire pressures equal and up to recommendation.
(That does NOT mean the max. pressure on the sidewall.)

But the rider really IS the most important part.

Loose grip on the bars. As much as possible, let the Spyder track a straight line by itself.
Try not to over-react (or react at all most of the time) to feelings that it is turning on it's own.
One wheel can go over a bump or dip and tilt the rider slightly.......but still maintain a straight line without any help from you.

And then some basics no matter how many wheels you have:
Lean into the curves a bit. For a different reason but it just feels better.
Look THROUGH curves and not at the road immediately ahead.
Many riders don't learn this on 2 wheels either.

And finally, if you ride a lot on asphalt roads that are old enough to have "tracks" worn down where the tires usually run, then ONE of your Spyder tires will almost always be on the top or side of a ridge in the road. THAT makes it VERY difficult to "feel" how the bike is tracking. This most often happens with the rear and is a whole new feeling.

Many short rides with a day in between is better for learning than LONG rides out on the road.
Thank you for the advice
 
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